Ministering Like the Master

Three Messages for Today's Preachers

(1 customer review)
Look Inside Price £5.50

Weight 0.11 kg
Dimensions 18.1 × 12.1 × 0.8 cm
binding

Paperback

format

Book

page-count

104

isbn

9781848717886

scripture

New Testament

Original Pub Date

2003

Banner Pub Date

2017

Book Description

Christ was not a boring preacher! ‘How wonderful it would be,’ says Stuart Olyott in the introduction to this book, ‘if Christian preachers throughout the world were ministering like their Master!’ Drawing on examples of Christ’s preaching from the Gospels, Olyott challenges preachers today with three features of their Master’s ministry. Christ’s style and method were not boring, but gripping. Christ’s preaching was evangelistic. Christ’s ministry was more than just preaching: his whole life was ministry. In a fresh, compelling and practical way, Olyott guides preachers away from some of the perils and pitfalls that could hinder their success. In so doing, he shows us just how essential Christ’s example is to those who seek to minister in his name today.

Table of Contents Expand ↓

INTRODUCTION vii
1 OUR LORD WAS NOT A BORING PREACHER 1
2 OUR LORD WAS AN EVANGELISTIC PREACHER 37
3 OUR LORD WAS NOT JUST A PREACHER 69

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1 testimonial for Ministering Like the Master

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  1. Andrew Young

    I had the pleasure of listening to this author many times in college lectures, seminars and church services. I’ve always found his work and ministry to be very helpful. This short book is no different. It contains three chapters on the subject of preaching. The chapters are very clear, with much practical advice.
    In the first chapter, Stuart Olyott shows that Christ was not a boring preacher. He shows this by looking at Christ’s sermon on the mount from Matthew chapters 5-7. From this passage of the Bible, he brings out three key principles that preachers should take note of:
    1. State – the use ordinary words in an interesting way, including the use of repetition and rhetorical questions;
    2. Illustrate – the use of everyday objects in the home, in the church, and in everyday life, in order to make a point clearer;
    3. Apply – the application of the Word to hearers in a relevant and appropriate way.
    The second chapter shows us that Christ was an evangelistic preacher. This is shown by a study of Matthew 11:20-30. The lessons here are that preachers should:
    1. Point the finger – at different groups of people, at sin, and towards the judgement;
    2. Bend the knee – seek God as you minister and submit to Him;
    3. Open your arms – remember that explaining the facts of the gospel is not enough. Christ gives a welcoming, loving gospel invitation (Matthew 11:28-30). So should we!
    Finally, from Mark 1, Olyott shows that Christ was more than just a preacher. As he goes through the chapter, he points out that Christ was not cut off from the real world. Christ identifies with sinners, experiences temptation, engages in personal conversation, confronts evil, cares for the sick, maintains a life of prayer, and touches the untouchable.
    The book is aimed at preachers. As someone who is involved with preaching in my local church and community, I found the content very helpful. In fact, I would say that no matter how long someone has been preaching for, they ought to find many useful insights in this book, in order to enhance their ministry. It is hoped that in reading this, many might be encouraged to minister like their master!

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