Section navigation

Review: Let’s Study Matthew

Author
Category Book Reviews
Date March 26, 2010

The Let’s Study series aims to explain the Bible in a clear and understandable way and then apply it to our lives today. Let’s Study Matthew by Mark Ross admirably fulfils these objectives.

Writing from a reformed evangelical perspective, Mark Ross accepts Matthew’s teaching on such doctrines as the virgin birth, Jesus’ divine and human nature, and the reality of the miracles and therefore does not devote space to debating such matters. Instead he concentrates on carefully explaining the meaning of the text as it stands, accepting it as the word of God.

The author does not gloss over the teaching when it is difficult. For instance there is an excellent discussion on harmonising the fact that we are saved by grace with Jesus’ teaching that the final judgement will be based on works. (Matthew 25: 31 to 45).

In his application Mark Ross’s style is gentle – he uses “we” rather than “you”.

This book is good value at over 300 pages long. Nearly all of the 70 chapters contain a helpful one paragraph summary at the end. This is not an in-depth commentary so some important passages are covered only briefly (such as the Beatitudes).

This book will be helpful to message-preparers and Bible study leaders, but it will be of most use to ordinary Christians who wish to deepen their faith. Up to now whenever I have been spiritually low I have turned to Bishop Ryle’s famous Expository thoughts on the Gospels to refresh my soul. Now I may well turn to this volume. For me this is high praise indeed!


This article first appeared on GoodBookReviews.org.uk. The site has been closed as of March 2019.

Latest Articles

Music in the Work of Calvin (Part Two) December 10, 2019

This second half of the address by the most eminent of all Calvin’s biographers was delivered in the ‘Salle de la Reformation’, at Geneva, in April 1902. It was translated and printed in the Princeton Theological Review, October 1909, from which source it is here reprinted with very slight abridgement. Emile Doumergue (1844-1937) was, at this […]

Music in the Life of Calvin (Part One) December 6, 2019

This address by the most eminent of all Calvin’s biographers was delivered in the ‘Salle de la Reformation’, at Geneva, in April 1902. It was translated and printed in the Princeton Theological Review, October 1909, from which source it is here reprinted with very slight abridgement. The allusions at the opening of the Address are […]