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Henry C. Fish

Henry Clay Fish (1820-77) was a Baptist clergyman. He studied at an academy, taught for two years in Massachusetts, and then entered the Union theological seminary in New York, where he was graduated in 1845. On the following day he was ordained pastor of the Baptist Church at Somerville, N. D., and remained there till January 1851, when he entered on the pastorate of the 1st Baptist Church in Newark, New Jersey. In 1858 the degree of D. D. was conferred upon him by the University of Rochester, N.Y. At the beginning of the civil war he actively supported the National government, spread the flag of the United States on his altar, and caused the National anthems to be sung in his Church services.

On 1 June 1864, he was drafted into the military service, and, determining at once to go to the field, he notified the officers of the Church to that effect. He was persuaded with great difficulty to relinquish his purpose, and allow a substitute to be sent in his stead. He was a man of great industry, and was actively engaged in advancing the interests of education and missions. He also did much by his writings to popularize life insurance. Beside a large number of tracts and sermons, he was the author of several valuable works including a Handbook of RevivalsPower in the Pulpit is a reprint of an article which appeared in the British and Foreign Evangelical Review (1862).

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