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Review: Power in the Pulpit

Author
Category Book Reviews
Date May 23, 2014

This short booklet is reprint of an article that first appeared in the British and Foreign Evangelical Review in 1862.

Having acknowledged that the work and help of the Holy Spirit is indispensable in preaching, the author concentrates on the human aspects that can lead to power in the pulpit. Three areas are discussed: the matter, the manner and the man.

In days of froth and frolic and lightness and laughter in many pulpits this book is a call back to the old paths, to the style of preaching that God used to bring about great revivals in the 18th and 19th century.

Don’t be put off by the book’s size. There is a huge amount of teaching within its few pages. For instance when talking about the man he speaks about goodness, courage, experience, industriousness, sympathy, enthusiasm, earnestness, passion, prayer, faithfulness and holiness.

All preachers will benefit from reading Pastor Fish’s wise words. May the Lord raise up such men to preach the everlasting gospel with power!


This review was first published on GoodBookReviews.org.uk. The site has been closed as of March 2019.

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