The Works Of George Swinnock

Volume 5: The Door of Salvation Opened by the Key of Regeneration, The Sinner's Last Sentence

Look Inside Price £14.00

Weight 0.77 kg
Dimensions 22.3 × 14.3 × 3.6 cm
page-count

482

format

Book

Original Pub Date

1672 (actually 1868)

Banner Pub Date

Oct 31, 1992

topic

Man & Sin, Salvation, The End Times

binding

Cloth-bound

isbn

9780851516417

Endorsement

His work comes ‘from one both of a good head and heart’. , THOMAS MANTON

‘George Swinnock had the gift of illustration largely developed, as his works prove…they served his purpose, and made his teaching attractive…there remains “a rare amount of sanctified wit and wisdom”.’– C.H. SPURGEON

Book Description

George Swinnock is one of the easiest of the Puritan authors to read. Long out of print, this republication of his works will be welcomed by all who have an interest in and love for Puritan literature.

Table of Contents Expand ↓

  THE DOOR OF SALVATION OPENED BY THE KEY OF REGENERATION  
  THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY, 3
  To THE READER, 9
  AN EPISTLE TO THE READER, 10
I The opening of the words, and the doctrine, 15
II The description or nature of regeneration in the several causes of it, 20
III The reason why regeneration is necessary in all that will obtain salvation, 38
IV The first use of the doctrine, containing the gross delusion of all unregenerate persons, 41
V Shewing the insufficiency of ten particulars to speak a Christian’s right to heaven, 46
VI A use by way of trial, wherein the character of re­generate persons is set down, with some quicken­ing motives to examination, 83
VII Containing more marks of a regenerate person, 112
VIII Containing an exhortation to endeavour after re­generation, 120
IX The first help to regeneration, Serious consideration, 123
X The first subject of consideration, The misery of the unregenerate in this world, 128
XI The misery of the unregenerate in the other world, 136
XII The second subject of consideration, The felicity of the regenerate in this world, 144
XIII The felicity of the regenerate in the other world, 160
XIV The third subject of consideration, The excellency of regeneration, 174
XV The fourth subject of consideration, The necessity of regeneration, 188
XVI The fifth subject of consideration, The equity of re­generation, or living to God, 194
XVII The second help to regeneration, An observation or knowledge of those several steps whereby the spirit of God reneweth other souls, and a pliable carriage and submission to its workings and motions, 200
  The third help to regeneration, 234
XVIII An answer to three objections, 242
XIX An exhortation to the regenerate, 251
XX A second exhortation to the regenerate, to do what they can for the conversion of others, 257
  THE SINNER’S LAST SENTENCE  
  THE EPISTLE DEDICATORY, 265
  To THE READER, 267
I The preface and introduction to the text, 269
II The division and brief explication of, 274
III Concerning the privative part of the sinner’s punish­ment, 278
IV The properties of the sinner’s loss, 281
V The reasons of the sinner’s privative punishment 283
VI Uses concerning the heinous nature of sin, and grievous misery of sinners, 285
VII Containing the folly of sinners, and the vast differ­ence between them and the godly at the great day, 290
VIII A use of trial, with the marks of those that shall be banished Christ’s presence, 293
IX An exhortation to fly from this wrath to come, with some helps thereunto, 294
X The positive part of the sinner’s misery, expressed by fire, and why, 296
XI The difference between our fires and hell fires, 298
XII The fulness of wicked men’s misery, in that it is positive and privative, with some cautions against it, 301
XIII The eternity of the sinner’s misery in the other world, with the grand reason of it, 303
XIV How little cause to envy sinners, and how careful we should be to avoid their eternal misery, 305
XV The reason of Christ’s severe sentence, and a ques­tion resolved, Whether the righteous, by their acts of charity, do not deserve heaven, as well as the wicked, by their omission thereof, deserve hell, 308
XVI Why Christ will try men at the great day by acts of charity, 311
XVII Three particulars about the text, 315
XVIII That sins of omission are dangerous and damnable, 317
XIX The nature of sins of omission in general, 319
XX Three distinctions about sins of omission, 321
XXI The agreement and difference between sins of omis­sion and sins of commission, 324
XXII The danger of sins of omission, in the heinous nature of them, and their offensiveness to God, 327
XXIII The danger of sins of omission, in their destructive­ness to mall, and our proneness to overlook them, 333
XXIV The reasons why sins of omission are damnable, 339
XXV Further reasons why Christ at the great day will condemn men fur sins of omission, 343
XXVI Of the doctrine by way of information, How dread­ful will be the condition of those that live in sins of commission, 348
XXVII Negative godliness is not enough-Christ’s impar­tiality in judgment, 352
XXVIII Practical godliness necessary, 358
XXIX The condition of men only civil is unsafe and sad, 360
XXX Sinners’ conviction at the day of judgment The purity of Christ’s religion above all others, 364
XXXI The holiest have cause of humiliation, 370
XXXII Use of trial, whether we be guilty of these omis­sions or no, 373
XXXIII A caution against sins of omission in regard of the matter of duties, 379
XXXIV Arguments against omissions The positiveness of our rule, and of God’s mercies, 386
XXXV Arguments against ormssions  Christ purchased positive as well as negative holiness, and our privileges oblige to both, 389
XXXVI Arguments against omissions We profess ourselves God’s servants, and all our religion will come to nothing without positive holiness, 393
XXXVII Arguments against omissions God deserves our positive obedience before all others, and true sanctification cannot be without it, 397
XXXVIII If God should omit his care of us a moment we are undone And if Christ had omitted the least in our work of redemption, we had been lost Irre­coverably, 401
XXXIX Arguments against sins of omission The new nature in believers inclines them to positive as well as negative holiness, and the profit will an­swer the pains, 405
XL Arguments against sins of omission God delights chiefly in our doing good j and our opportunities for doing good will quickly be gone, 412
XLI The grand cause of sins of omission, an unregene­rate heart; with the cure of it, a renewed nature, 416
XLII Another cause of sins of omission, ignorance; with the cure of it, labouring after knowledge, 424
XLIII Another cause of sins of omission, idleness, with the cure of it, 429
XLIV Another cause of omissions is vain excuses men have, that omissions’ are little sins; with the cure of it, 434
XLV Another excuse for sins of omission, which is a cause of them, that they would be unseasonable, and so are deferred to that time which never comes; with the answer to it, 449
XLVI A third excuse for sins of omission, it is but one sin; with the answer to it, 453
XLVII A fifth cause of sins of omission, the example of others; with the cure of it, 457
   INDEX 463

Testimonials

Submit your testimonial

There are no testimonials yet, would you like to submit yours?

You may also like…

    image of the Works of George Swinnock 5 volume set
    price £62.00

    Description

    Swinnock is one of the easiest Puritan authors to read. He is theological, yet his doctrine is expressed in vivid fashion. While practical, his counsel is marked by a keen sensitivity to scriptural doctrine. Approx. 520pp. per volume.

More items to consider:

    The Works Of George Swinnock

    Volume 3: Latter Portion of the Christian Man's Calling, Heaven and Hell Epitomised, and a Portion of The Fading of the Flesh

    by George Swinnock


    price £14.00

    Description

    Swinnock is one of the easiest Puritan authors to read. He is theological, yet his doctrine is expressed in vivid fashion. While practical, his counsel is marked by a keen sensitivity to scriptural doctrine. Approx. 520pp. per volume.

    Collected Writings of John Murray

    Collected Writings of John Murray

    Volume 2: Systematic Theology

    by John Murray


    price £19.00

    Description

    Swinnock is one of the easiest Puritan authors to read. He is theological, yet his doctrine is expressed in vivid fashion. While practical, his counsel is marked by a keen sensitivity to scriptural doctrine. Approx. 520pp. per volume.

    Last Things

    The Last Things

    Death, Judgment, Heaven and Hell

    by Paul Helm


    price £4.00

    Description

    Swinnock is one of the easiest Puritan authors to read. He is theological, yet his doctrine is expressed in vivid fashion. While practical, his counsel is marked by a keen sensitivity to scriptural doctrine. Approx. 520pp. per volume.