Romans 7:1-8:4

Volume 6: The Law, Its Functions and Limits

(1 customer review)
Look Inside Price £17.75

Weight 0.56 kg
Dimensions 22.3 × 14.3 × 2.5 cm
binding

Cloth-bound

format

Book

page-count

372

set

Romans

vol

6

isbn

9780851511801

scripture

Romans

Original Pub Date

1973

Banner Pub Date

Dec 1, 1973

Book Description

This volume deals with what is undoubtedly one of the most controversial chapters in the Bible. ‘It will be clear from the exposition that the theme of this volume is no mere fascinating theological or intellectual problem, but one which is of vital importance to Christian experience, and to the health, well-being, and vigour of the Church.’– From the author’s preface

Table of Contents Expand ↓

Preface Xi
One 1
The correct approach to a controversial chapter – the purpose of the chapter – a bird’s eye view – the relevance of the teaching – three mistakes made by Christians.
Two 14
Law in general, the indirect approach – marriage as a picture of the unbeliever’s relationship to the Law – four reasons for choosing this illustration – the nature of our death to the Law.
Three 29
A general definition of the Christian life – a radical change – the tests of life ­the centrality of Christ – the body of Christ, crucified and raised.
Four 42
Union with Christ in His death to the Law – the old husband and the new ­loyalty to the new husband – an indissoluble relationship.
Five 55
The privileges of our marriage – our possessions in Christ – His love and care ­fruit, the purpose of the union.
Six 68
The necessity of the change – life in the flesh – passions and lusts – the positive power of sin – the futility of morality.
Seven 83
The completeness of the change for all Christians – our discharge from the Law’s control – the aim of our deliverance – the new slavery – letter and spirit.
Eight 96
Seven particular differences between the old life and the new – the external and the internal – understanding – letter and spirit – motive – liberty – power ­progression to glory.
Nine 109
The vindication of the Law – the preliminary ‘law-work’ – lusts and sin – the tenth commandment and Paul’s knowledge of sin.
Ten 120
Sin as a power – the Law used as a fulcrum – the slave-master – the aggravation of lawlessness – practical conclusions.
Eleven 132
An analysis of his own experience – sin lying dormant – the ‘coming’ of the Law – self-confidence dies – the test of our reaction to the Law.
Twelve 147
The Law and life – the Law and death – diagnosis of the moral state of the country – sin’s use of the Law to deceive – the darkening of the understanding.
Thirteen 161
The holiness and goodness of the Law – the exposing of the sinfulness of sin ­Paul’s experience under conviction of sin – the time of this experience.
Fourteen 176
Three interpretations of v, 14ff – the inductive method – general analysis of the section – the theme still the function of the Law – the change of tense ­the meaning of ‘carnal’.
Fifteen 189
The key-phrase – the implications of ‘sold under sin’ for the various views ­v15, a description of his life as a whole – defeat, failure and regeneration.
Sixteen 201
Logical inferences – a daring statement – a complicated description of duality ­confession, not excuse – sin frustrating the Law.
Seventeen 213
The law of his daily experience – the inward man and the members – a different law – various interpretations of ‘captivity’ – an anguished cry of defeat.
Eighteen 225
An interjection of praise – consideration of the passage as a whole – com­parison with other, apparently similar, passages – Galatians 5, I Corinthians 9, etc., show victory not defeat.
Nineteen 238
Paul’s description of the regenerate man incompatible with this passage – other writers considered – some attempted reconciliations – the second blessing theory – the conclusion.
Twenty 258
The connection of chapter 8 with chapter 5 – outline of the chapter – the out­working of the theme as stated in verse I.
Twenty-one 269
Justification, not sanctification, the theme – no more condemnation – union with Christ the guarantee of our ultimate glorification.
Twenty-two 280
Matters of translation – a wrong interpretation in terms of sanctification ­proof that ‘the law of sin and death’ is the Law of God.- the law of the Spirit and the reign of grace.
Twenty-three 295
The enjoyment of assurance – the impossible thing of the Law – Dr. Hodge’s interpretation refuted – righteousness imparted as well as imputed.
Twenty-four 308
The helplessness of man – God’s salvation – the eternal Sonship of Christ – the second Man, the guarantee of our salvation.
Twenty-five 318
The reality of the Incarnation – Christ’s sinlessness – the Virgin Birth and ‘the Immaculate Conception’ – the infirmities of Christ’s human nature – the necessity for a coming as man.
Twenty-six 332
An offering for sin – Perfectionism not taught here – Christ’s death and imparted righteousness – justification and sanctification not to be separated.
Twenty-seven 343
The general tenor of the Christian’s life – different appearances of walking in the flesh – the leading of the Spirit – a false division between Christians – holiness and assurance.
Appendix 357
Puritan testimony

1 testimonial for Romans 7:1-8:4

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  1. Richard C Ross

    The near legendary status of ‘the Doctor’s’ exposition of Romans tends to overwhelm objectivity. I trust it’ll not be out-of-place to suggest the interpretation in this particular volume isn’t the only position that could claim to be a fair representation of the Apostle’s thought.

    The ‘man of Romans 7’ is here considered as neither unregenerate nor regenerate (or maybe both. I understand these points have been discussed at length and often, but not here.) There are obvious problems with this position; this isn’t the place to deal with them, but it is the place to mention them, and that for pastoral reasons. The view adopted in this exposition is eccentric: off the beaten track and exegetically questionable. But most suspect for being pastorally disturbing. It’s a risky thing to tell a (true) believer, sensitive to indwelling sin, that no (truly) regenerate person could (or should) cry out as the ‘man of Romans 7’ – even though Job, Moses, Jeremiah, David, Elijah, etc. did so (so too a ‘great cloud of witnesses’ in all subsequent ages). Any such will find support were they to consult the third volume of the Works of Thomas Brooks; or wade through volume 6 of the Works of John Owen, (or the modernised sections in ‘Puritan Paperbacks’). Or they may add ‘A Lifting Up of the Downcast’ to their reading list. Here they’ll find that a (true) child of God may undoubtedly know such a conflict within: ‘He that propounds evidences of grace, which are only proper to eminent Christians, as belonging to all true Christians, will certainly grieve and sad those precious lambs of Christ that He would not have grieved and saddened’. (Thomas Brooks, Works. III, 252) I recall Rabbi Duncan: ‘Thomas Shepherd is fine, but I wish I were as good as one of his hypocrites!’

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